Margaretsville Light Activation Updated

Hello everyone,

Just a reminder that a group of us plan to operate from the Margaretsville Lighthouse this Sunday, 25 September. We will start setting up mid-morning, and plan to be on the air by noon. We’ll operate until 1600 or so.

We will have stations on CW and/or SSB on 40 and 20m, and will operate several digital modes on the 30m band. Antennas will include dipoles and quarter-wave verticals.

The forecast looks good – a mix of sun and clouds. It will be a little cool, so you may want to bring a jacket. If you plan to spend much time there, snacks and something to drink are advised.

Once again, this is a low-stress operation. Emphasis will be placed on having fun and learning how to set up an effective station in the field.

While several people have indicated that they plan to be there, we always have room for more! I hope to see you there!

73
Al, VO1NO / VA1AVR

TO5FP – St. Pierre & Miquelon

Team F4HEC Freddy, F1RAF Nicolas, FK8IK Michel, F5TMJ Laurent is currently activating FP (DXCC 277, NA-032) until september 20th 2016.

Activity expected on 10-80 m CW, phone, RTTY.

QSL & confirmation: LoTW, clubLog OQRS. Use only OQRS for QSL. Do not send your QSL, we don’t need it.

Check here QSO (real time log): http://www.a6dx.com/QSO/to5fp/

Check QSO on Club Log (updated once a day): http://www.clublog.org/charts/?c=TO5FP

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See original article at qrznow.com

Margaretsville Light Activation

Hello everyone. A few of us are planning an operating event at a nearby lighthouse that might be of interest to you.

There are a lot of Hams around the world who like to collect QSL cards from lighthouses. I checked the figures, and discovered that Nova Scotia has more lighthouses than any other province or state in North America (312 lighthouses!). The Amateur Radio Lighthouse Society has assigned identifying designators to those lighthouses, and gives awards in several categories for working lighthouse stations.

Fort Point lighthouse and bell tower with ARLHS radio antenna.

Fort Point lighthouse and bell tower with ARLHS radio antenna.

Our Official “Grand Opening” Announcement

Good day,

I am very pleased to announce the formation of a new Amateur Radio club in Nova Scotia!

The Annapolis Valley Amateur Radio Club (AVARC) is an informal association of Hams. We have no constitution, bylaws or membership dues at present.  Instead, we keep members up to date on developments and news of interest through our website and Facebook page, and periodically gather to participate in club activities such as Field Day, or to assist members.  Although it is primarily for Amateurs in the Annapolis Valley of Nova Scotia, membership is open to anyone interested in the art, science and magic of radio.

Among other topics, we promote DX’ing, contesting, weak signal VHF operating, digital modes, and public service.   Education is one of our primary concerns, both to expand our own knowledge and to help those who want to become Amateurs.  We have dedicated a section of our web page to a series of presentations covering the entire Basic Qualification curriculum.  Additional presentations on different aspects of Ham Radio will be added in due time.  We believe that there is far more to Amateur Radio than just Two Meter FM repeaters!

We are also very conscious of the valuable role that Amateurs can play in times of emergency.  To that end we emphasize our ability to set up portable stations such as during Field Day, and developing the skills to pass information in a crisp, efficient and professional manner.

Our web page can be found at http://avarc.ca.  If you would like to be added to our e-mail list, or if you want to become an Amateur Radio operator, please use the “Contact Us” tab.

We are also on Facebook.  Look for Annapolis Valley Amateur Radio Operators.

Thank you and 73,
Doug McComber
VE1FAL
Webmaster

Field Day 2016 Wrap Up

Hello everyone,

Well, that was one heck of an excellent weekend! Thanks so much to all those who participated and assisted in making Field Day 2016 a huge success!

We had two objectives for Field Day. The first was to practice those skills necessary to operate in an emergency – deploy to a remote location, set up effective stations without relying on commercial power, and make QSOs in an efficient manner. The second was to have a fun and interesting weekend. I can safely say that BOTH these objectives were met quite handily!

The setup crew started at 0830, and by noon had two towers in the air, complete with triband Yagis and inverted V antennas. The tents were easily set up, and by 1500 we had two stations in operation and a field galley set up. The logging software worked well, and our local network had very strong signals, thanks to our helical antennas – we probably could have separated our stations by 2 km and still maintained the network!

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